[Summit] Fw: Featured Events at Brwon through February 21

David Kolsky davidjkolsky at yahoo.com
Thu Feb 11 17:32:01 CST 2016



Featured Events at Brown University through February 9#yiv0271498991 a:link, #yiv0271498991 a:visited {font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:11px;color:#996633;text-decoration:none;margin-top:0;padding-top:0;font-weight:normal;}#yiv0271498991 #yiv0271498991description {line-height:1.3;}#yiv0271498991 hr {border:0;color:#cccccc;background-color:#cccccc;height:2px;text-align:left;}


 Guidelines for Submission | Read this on the Web  Wednesday 10 February 12:30pm   Zika Virus: Separating Fact from Fiction    As the Center for Disease Control and Prevention adds more destinations to the Zika virus travel alerts, several medical professionals will take part in a panel discussion titled "Zika Virus: Separating Fact from Fiction." Panelists include Brenna L. Hughes, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology; Maria Mileno, associate professor of medicine; Mark Lurie, associate professor of epidemiology; and Rebecca Reece, assistant professor of medicine and medical consultant at Rhode Island Department of Health's Division of Preparedness, Response, Infectious Disease, and Emergency Medical Services. Sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the event begins at 12:30 p.m. in the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Joukowsky Forum, 111 Thayer St.  http://watson.brown.edu/events/2016/zika-virus-separating-fact-fiction
   Wednesday 10 February 7:00pm   The American Dream?    Professors Charles Lee and Seth Rockman will discuss success, God, and the pursuit of happiness as part of a Veritas Forum panel discussion on "The American Dream?" Lee is a professor of management at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. An author and associate professor of history, Rockman specializes in 19th century United States history with a focus on the relationship between slavery and capitalism in American economic and social development. The annual forum offers participants a platform to learn about where Christianity falls within a contemporary society, as science seeks to provide a complete explanation of nature. The discussion will be moderated by Andrew Foster, director of Populations Studies and Training Center. The event is free, but tickets are required. The event is sponsored by Athletes in Action, The Branch (Chi Alpha), the Brown Christian Fellowship, Reformed University Fellowship, Cru, Cornerstone Magazine, and RISD Christian Fellowship. The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, De Ciccio Family Auditorium, the College Green.  http://veritas.org/campuses/brown-university/
   Thursday 11 February 4:00pm   The United States in the New World Disorder    Ambassador Chas W. Freeman Jr. will deliver a lecture titled "The United States in the New World Disorder," the second in a three-part series about American diplomacy. Freeman, senior fellow at the Watson Institute, will discuss alternative structures for the United States' alliances and national security approaches as the country shifts away from the past international world order. Freeman is a former U.S. assistant secretary of defense, ambassador to Saudi Arabia (during operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm), acting assistant secretary of state for African affairs, and chargé d'affaires at both Bangkok and Beijing. He was the principal American interpreter during President Nixon's visit to Beijing in 1972. The lecture will be live streamed. A reception will follow the talk. The event begins at 4 p.m. in the Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum, 111 Thayer St.  https://news.brown.edu/articles/2016/01/freeman
   Thursday 11 February 4:15pm   Lecture with conductor Gil Rose    The Department of Music presents a lecture by conductor Gil Rose as part of its inaugural Music Now series. Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project will be in residence for the spring of 2016 to work with Brown students and faculty. Founding the BMOP in 1996, Rose gained international praise for his works in classical music. The ensemble recently partnered with several groups to create the world premiere of Tod Machover’s Death and the Powers, a nominee for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize in music. The event begins at 4:15 p.m. in the Orwig Music Building, Room 315, located on the corner of Young Orchard Avenue and Hope Street.  http://www.brown.edu/academics/music/events
   Thursday 11 February 5:45pm   Reducing Mass Incarceration and the Future of Prison Reform    Amid growing concerns about overcrowding jails in California, Don Specter will lead a discussion on "Reducing Mass Incarceration and the Future of Prison Reform." After the federal government ordered the Golden State to reduce its prison population by more 30,000 people in 2011, state officials worked out a solution that involved transferring inmates to local prisons. Today, many are looking to California to see whether prison reform is possible. Specter will discuss the 2011 decision, its aftermath, and what the future holds for the state and country. Specter is the executive director of the Prison Law Office in California and lead attorney for the incarcerated complainants in Brown v. Plata. Organized by the Brown ACLU student group, the event is free and open to the public. The event begins at 5:45 p.m. in Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106, 95 Cushing St.  https://orgsync.com/102085/chapter
   Thursday 11 February 7:00pm   Film screening: Saravah    The Brazil Initiative presents a screening of Saravah, directed by Pierre Barouh. A 1969 documentary, the film focuses on the "changing of the guard" in Brazilian popular music. The film is in Portuguese and does not have English subtitles. Co-sponsored by the Department of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies, the event begins at 7 p.m. in the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Joukowsky Forum, 111 Thayer St.  http://watson.brown.edu/events/2016/screening-saravah
   Friday 12 February 6:00am to Wednesday 2 March 8:30pm   Black History Month Film Series    The Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice presents the Black History Month Film Series, an eclectic mix of film screenings and discussions in honor of the annual observance of black history. The series will feature several films at various locations throughout the month of February, through March 2. Screenings include Freedom Riders, Slavery by Another Name, Freedom Summer, and others. Hosted by CSSJ and the Providence Public Library, all events are free and open to the public. The next screening takes place Feb. 12 in the Providence Public Library, 150 Empire St., at 6 p.m. A discussion moderated by professor Tony Bogues will follow. For a complete program, visit http://www.brown.edu/initiatives/slavery-and-justice/black-history-month-film-series-partnership-providence-public-library.  
   Friday 12 February 2:00pm   Book discussion: Democratic Dynasties    Several scholars will take part in a book discussion about Kanchan Chandra's Democratic Dynasties: State, Party and Family in Contemporary Indian Politics, hosted by the Brown India Initiative. Commentators include Pradeep Chhibber, professor and Indo-American chair in Indian studies at the Institute for South Asia Studies at the University of California; Daniel Smith, assistant professor at Harvard University's Department of Government; and Ashutosh Varshney, professor of political science and international affairs and a regular contributor to news outlets. The event begins at 2 p.m. in the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Joukowsky Forum, 111 Thayer St.  http://www.brown.edu/initiatives/india/
   Friday 12 February 4:00pm   9/11 Warping and its Discontents: Our Security State, Racism, and Foreign Policy    The Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America presents a lecture by Ramzi Kassem titled "9/11 Warping and its Discontents: Our Security State, Racism, and Foreign Policy." Kassem, associate professor of law at the City University of New York School of Law, will discuss how the Sept. 11 attacks made plausible an omnipresent threat that is shaping security systems, a phenomenon Kassem refers to as "9/11 warping." His lecture will explore the link between 9/11 warping, structural racism, and U.S. foreign policy. The lecture is sponsored by co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy, The Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, the Department of Religious Studies, and Middle East Studies. The event begins at 4 p.m. in the Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106, 95 Cushing St.  http://www.brown.edu/academics/race-ethnicity/events/2016/02/ramzi-kassem-911-warping-and-its-discontents-our-security-state-racism-and-foreign-po
   Friday 12 February 5:30pm   Alexander Potts on 19th Century Realism    The Department of History of Art and Architecture presents an Anita Glass Memorial Lecture by Alexander Potts titled "Nineteenth Century Realism and the Picturing of the Social in Early Modern Art." A professor at the University of Michigan, Potts is interested in sculptural aesthetics and the history of sculpture. He is the author of Flesh and the Ideal: Winckelmann and the Origins of Art History (1994), The Sculptural Imagination: Figurative, Modernist, Minimalist (2000), and has co-edited other texts on modern sculpture. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. in the List Art Center, Room 110, 64 College St.  https://www.brown.edu/academics/art-history/upcoming-events-2015-16
   Friday 12 February 8:00pm   Faculty Showcase Concert with BMOP    The Boston Modern Orchestra Project will perform a Faculty Showcase concert under the direction of conductor Gil Rose, who will be accompanied by saxophonist Philipp Stäudlin. The program will include works by Brown professors Eric Nathan, Butch Rovan, and Wang Lu, which includes a performance of  LUMEN (2014), Ariel Variations (1999), Siren Songs, and many others. A reception will follow the performance. Rose and BMOP will be in residence for the spring of 2016 to work with Brown students and faculty. The event is free and open to the public, but tickets are required. The event begins at 8 p.m. in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Martinos Auditorium, 154 Angell St. For more information, call 401-863-3234.  http://www.brown.edu/academics/music/events
   Monday 15 February 5:30pm   How Chocolate Came to Be    Kathryn Sampeck will deliver a lecture on "How Chocolate Came to Be," hosted by the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. Although the allure and mainstream popularity of chocolate cannot be denied, few admirers of the centuries-old "sweet" would know about its involvement in some of the horrors of Spanish colonialism. Sampeck will discuss how the contemporary taste of chocolate has roots in colonial choices such as who produced chocolate, for whom, and other details. Taste samples will be provided by Taza Chocolate, based in Somerville, Mass. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 001, the College Green.  http://www.brown.edu/research/facilities/haffenreffer-museum/events
   Monday 15 February 5:30pm   Virtual Reality for the Times    Representatives from the New York Times will take part in a discussion titled "Virtual Reality for the Times: Inside the Launch of NYT-VR," co-sponsored by the Cogut Center for the Humanities, Arts at Brown, and the Creative Arts Council. Sydney Levin, an executive producer at NYT's T Brand Studio, and Michael Villaseñor, creative director at NYT, will discuss the launch of the Times' virtual reality project that aims to provide a new way to ingest news and other content. Visitors will be able to experience several immersive pieces of footage including presidential campaign events and Walking New York. Theodore Bogosian, a visiting assistant professor, and members from the Cogut Center and Arts at Brown will moderate the discussion. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Granoff Center for the Humanities, Martinos Auditorium, 154 Angell St.  https://www.brown.edu/academics/humanities/index.php?q=events/cogut-center-events
   Tuesday 16 February 2:30pm   A reading by writer and artist Shelley Jackson    Shelley Jackson, novelist and experimental writer and artist, will read from her work as part of the Program in Literary Arts' Writers On Writing Reading Series. Jackson is the author of numerous works including The Melancholy of Anatomy, Half Life, and Patchwork Girl. Her forthcoming novel will focus on ghosts, schools, and speech impediments. The event begins at 2:30 p.m. in the McCormack Family Theater, 70 Brown St.  https://www.brown.edu/academics/literary-arts/events
   Tuesday 16 February 5:00pm   Is Theology a Science?    Albert Duggan, associate university chaplain, will deliver a lecture titled "Is Theology a Science," a discussion about the intersection between religious reasoning and science. Duggan will discuss the purpose of theology and the ways it differs from, and shares similarities with, science. The event is sponsored by the Brown RISD Catholic community in partnership with the Thomistic Institute. The event begins at 5 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 001, the College Green.  http://www.brownrisdcatholic.org/events/is-theology-a-science
   Wednesday 17 February 12:00pm   The Legend of Enchanted Modernity    Marcelo Paixão will deliver a lecture titled "The Legend of Enchanted Modernity: Racial Injustice and Modernization in Brazil," presented by the Department Africana Studies and the Brazil Initiative. Paixão will examine the status of the human race in the debate about "racial democracy" and how this understanding is joined to the problem of social inequality and racial hierarchies in Brazil. His talk will be based on his 2014 book. Paixão is an associate professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. The lecture will be livestreamed. Co-sponsors include the Watson Institute, the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice, and the Center for Study of Race and Ethnicity in America. The event begins at noon in the Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum, 111 Thayer St.  http://watson.brown.edu/brazil/events/2016/marcelo-paix-o-legend-enchanted-modernity-racial-injustice-and-modernization-brazil
   Wednesday 17 February 4:30pm   A reading by novelist Paul La Farge    The Program in Literary Arts presents a reading by novelist Paul La Farge as part of its Contemporary Writers Reading Series. La Farge is the author of numerous novels including Luminous Airplanes (2011) and The Facts of Winter (2005), a book about imaginary dreams. The winner of the 2005 Bard Fiction Prize, La Farge is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. The event begins at 4:30 p.m. in the McCormack Family Theater, 70 Brown St.  https://www.brown.edu/academics/literary-arts/events
   Wednesday 17 February 6:30pm   The Beautiful Mathematically Ordered Colors of Birds    The Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics presents a lecture by Rodolfo Torres titled "The Beautiful Mathematically Ordered Colors of Birds." The lecture will focus on the physics behind the bright blue and green colors found in birds and how mathematics can be used to describe such coloration. Torres is the associate vice chancellor for the University of Kansas' Office of Research and a professor of mathematics. A light reception will precede the lecture at 5:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at ICERM, on the 11th floor of 121 South Main Street.  https://icerm.brown.edu/public_lectures/pl-16-cob/
   Wednesday 17 February 7:00pm   A reading by poet Alessandro De Francesco    Poet and essayist Alessandro De Francesco will read from his work as part of the Program in Literary Arts' Contemporary Writers Reading Series. A visiting professor at the European Graduate School, De Francesco is the author of several volumes of poetry and essays including Remote Vision and Augmented Writing. He has performed his work at various international venues such as the Fondation Louis Vuitton, the Berlin University of the Arts, and the Kelly Writers House at the University of Pennsylvania. De Francesco's reading will be read in English by his translator, poet Dusty Neu. The event begins at 7 p.m. in the McCormack Family Theater, 70 Brown St.  http://www.brown.edu/academics/literary-arts/events
   Thursday 18 February 4:00pm   Recovering Diplomatic Agility    Ambassador Chas W. Freeman Jr. will discuss "Recovering Diplomatic Agility," the last of a three-part series about Pax America, as part of the Watson Distinguished Speaker Series. As the U.S. moves into the third decade of the 21st century, politicians and future leaders of the free world must grapple with the notion that world affairs are no longer being shaped by fixed alliances. Freeman will discuss the current dilemma America is facing and how strategic nimbleness may help the U.S. in navigating the new international environment. A former U.S. assistant secretary of defense and ambassador to Saudi Arabia, Freeman was the principal American interpreter during President Nixon's visit to Beijing in 1972. The lecture will be live streamed. A reception will follow the discussion. Sponsored by the China Initiative, the event begins at 4 p.m. in the Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum, 111 Thayer St.  http://watson.brown.edu/events/2016/chas-freeman-recovering-diplomatic-agility
   Thursday 18 February 5:30pm   Arts and the University: Donna De Salvo    Curator Donna De Salvo will discuss the curatorial process and thinking behind the exhibition "America is Hard to See," hosted by the Office of the Vice Provost for the Arts. Salvo led the curatorial team that worked on the exhibition that opened the new location of the Whitney Museum of American Art. A senior curator and deputy director of international initiatives at the Whitney Museum, Salvo will discuss the new building, and the vision behind the acclaimed exhibit. The event is free, but tickets are required. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Martinos Auditorium, 154 Angell St.  
   Thursday 18 February 7:00pm   Film screening: Branco Sai, Preto Fica    The Watson Institute presents a screening of Branco Sai, Preto Fica (2014), as part of the Brazil Initiative 2016 Film Series. The documentary focuses on the explosion of violence at a dance party on the outskirts of Brasília, Brazil. The film will be presented in Portuguese with no English subtitles. Co-sponsored by the Department of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies, the event begins at 7 p.m. in the Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum, 111 Thayer St.  http://watson.brown.edu/brazil/events/2016/spring-2016-film-series-branco-sai-preto-fica-white-out-black-2014
   Thursday 18 February 7:00pm   Film screening: The Mask You Live In    Brown University Health Promotion presents a screening of The Mask You Live In, a documentary about "hypermasculinity" in America. The film follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating our country's narrow definition of masculinity. A discussion will follow the screening. Speakers include Joe Samalin, senior program manager at Breakthrough; Jasmine Torres, community education and prevention coordinator at the Women's Center of Rhode Island; and Jamall Pollock, psychotherapist at CAPS and facilitator of the Men Talking support group. The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Metcalf Research Building, auditorium, 190 Thayer St.  https://www.brown.edu/campus-life/health/services/promotion/
   
Exhibits
    Friday 28 August 10:00am to Friday 29 April 4:00pm   Uncovering Ancient Egypt: Ancient Crafts, Modern Technologies    The Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology presents "Uncovering Ancient Egypt: Ancient Crafts, Modern Technologies," an exhibition that offers a glimpse into how Brown researchers have used modern technologies to discover how objects in ancient Egypt were made and used thousands of years ago. Although some of the objects on display are worn and broken from the years, visitors are encouraged to look inside the objects to learn about their history. Compiled from the collections of the Haffenreffer Museum, the Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, the exhibition aims to answer questions about how these items played a role in the daily lives of Egyptians. The exhibition will be on display through spring 2016, in the Haffenreffer Museum, the College Green. Exhibition hours are Tuesday-Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., closed on Mondays and University holidays. For more information, call 401-863-5700.  http://www.brown.edu/research/facilities/haffenreffer-museum/uncovering-ancient-egypt-ancient-crafts-modern-technologies
   Monday 21 September 5:00pm to Friday 27 May 5:00pm   Native Re-Appropriations: Contemporary Indigenous Artists    Curated by Adrienne Keene, "Native Re-Appropriations: Contemporary Indigenous Artists" challenges viewers to examine existing stereotypes and issues facing Native Americans. The exhibition features the works of five Indigenous artists that engage in the politics of representations, cultural appropriation, and stereotypes. With the use of Native American imagery in popular culture, the exhibition aims to raise awareness of the diversity and modernity of Natives. The exhibit will be on display through May 2016 in the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, 80 Brown St. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed on weekends and University holidays. For more information, call 401-863-5775.  http://www.brown.edu/academics/race-ethnicity/events/2015/09/fall-welcome-native-re-appropriations-exhibit-opening-reception
   Tuesday 19 January 8:30am to Thursday 11 February 10:00pm   Annual Staff Appreciation Art Exhibit    In honor of the artistic talents of Brown University's staff, the Creative Arts Council presents the "After Hours: Annual Staff Appreciation Exhibit." Celebrating the work, excellence, and loyalty of staff, the exhibition is one of several occurrences planned out as part of Bear Month 2016. The exhibition will be on display through February 11 in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, 154 Angell St. Exhibition hours are Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m to midnight., Fridays from 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 10 p.m. A reception will be held on Feb. 11 at 5 p.m. For more information, call 401-863-3175.  http://www.brown.edu/about/administration/human-resources/bear-month-2016
   Saturday 23 January 1:00pm to Sunday 27 March 4:00pm   Dead Animals, or the curious occurrence of taxidermy in contemporary art    The David Winton Bell Gallery presents "Dead Animals, or the curious occurrence of taxidermy in contemporary art," an exhibition featuring a survey of the current artistic uses of taxidermy through the work of approximately 15 artists. Featuring a wide array of peculiar works, the exhibition includes a penguin/peacock hybrid, a wolf pelt that emerges from the ground, and many other works. The exhibition will be on display through Sunday, March 27, in the David Winton Bell Gallery, List Art Center, 64 College St. Exhibition hours are Monday-Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Fridays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and weekends from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 401-863-2932.  https://news.brown.edu/articles/2015/12/deadanimals
   Monday 25 January 10:00am to Friday 11 March 5:00pm   Vestiges of the Transatlantic Slave Trade    A pair of shackles like the ones used to transport captured Africans to slavery in the Americas will be on display as part of an exhibition titled "Vestiges of the Transatlantic Slave Trade." The shackles, on loan from the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, will be on display through March 13 in the lobby of the John Hay Library, 20 Prospect St. Although the shackles evoke strong emotions, it was also a powerful weapon that was used in campaigns to end the transatlantic slave trade. The exhibition is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice and the Brown University Library. Exhibition hours are Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed on weekends. For more information, call 401-863-5099.  https://news.brown.edu/articles/2016/01/shackles
   Thursday 28 January 8:00pm to Thursday 11 February 8:00pm   2x4: The Eighth Annual Brown | RISD Dual Degree Exhibition    The works of students in the Brown RISD Dual Degree program will be on display as part of the program's annual exhibit. Highlighting the artistic and inquisitive nature of students, the "2 x 4" exhibition includes a variety of mediums including works in 2-D and 3-D, visual and verbal, and installation and performance. The works are described as responding to "ideas of fundamentals, multiplicity, calculation, and construction." The exhibition will be on display through February 11 in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, 154 Angell St. Exhibition hours are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to midnight; Fridays from 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 6 p.m. and 10 p.m., respectively. For more information, email CreativeArts at brown.edu  
   For additional University events, visit http://calendar.brown.edu/Subscription Management: http://news.brown.edu/events/subscribe

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 To: David Kolsky 
 Sent: Tuesday, February 9, 2016 3:53 PM
 Subject: Featured Events Through February 21
   
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